Anxiety: Ways to Spot a Problem at Home

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As a parent, you have certainly experienced your share of anxiety. Whether stemming from a feeling of nervousness, worry, uncertainty, or fear, that sense of anxiousness from a lack of control is familiar to everyone at some point.

Even if you do not suffer from clinically diagnosed anxiety, it is important to recognize potential signs of an anxiety disorder in your child. The important thing to remember is that, if your child is struggling with anxiety, there are ways to manage it once diagnosed. Research suggests that 80 percent of children with clinical signs of an anxiety disorder are not getting treatment. The key, then, is awareness and the ability to spot how anxiety manifests itself in your child’s behavior.  

One thing is for sure—anxiety affects every child differently. Because anxiety is such a complex condition that is unique to each person, the symptoms vary greatly from child to child. Below are some of the more common indications that your child may be suffering from anxiety.

Avoidance

Again, everyone will experience anxiety from time to time, as it is a normal reaction to stress. However, an anxiety disorder begins to come into play when children start to exhibit avoidance behaviors. Because anxiety creates such a sense of helplessness, sufferers begin to avoid anxiety-inducing situations all together. For instance, if your child appears to be intentionally and regularly avoiding friends or activities, it may be in an effort to escape the anxiety that is produced in certain situations.

Inability to be comforted

Children with an anxiety disorder cope differently depending on each situation. One common thread is that, when anxiety strikes, the child is likely not easily comforted by a parent’s attention or coddling. This is obviously difficult for parents to understand, as your number one role is to comfort and soothe your child’s anguish. Just remember that anxiety can be an all-consuming emotional reaction to stress—one that is not eased simply with attention and hugs.  

Abnormally withdrawn

Shyness is typical in children. However, a child with an anxiety disorder is not only shy, but noticeably intimidated, withdrawn, and reluctant to engage with others. A child with anxiety may also be resistant to making eye contact, especially during one-on-one conversations. Avoiding eye contact or reluctance to speak (selective mutism) are signs that social interactions produce debilitating anxiety for your child. Social anxiety disorder affects children specifically in social situations. This may occur when a child feels uncomfortable with direct attention, large group settings, or meeting new people.

While occasional anxiety is typical and varies from child to child, it is important to know the common signs of a possibly larger problem. Statistics indicate that 1 in every 8 children will suffer from an anxiety disorder. With such a staggering number of affected children, awareness is the first line of defense when diagnosing and treating anxiety. For parents, knowing the signs and symptoms of a larger issue will mean the difference between proactively managing the condition and suffering in silence.  

 

It’s Not Always What it Seems: Anxiety in the Classroom

 

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Anxiety is something that educators are seeing more and more of in our children. With countless theories on the causes of this rising diagnosis, one thing is for sure—anxiety affects every child differently. Because anxiety is such a complex condition that is unique to each person, the symptoms vary from child to child. In fact, the symptoms may even vary from situation to situation. For instance, a child with anxiety may display different symptoms in different situations throughout the day.  Anxiety may manifest itself differently from classroom to classroom simply because of the environment or different stressors present.

Because anxiety presents itself in many different ways, it is often hard to initially see or understand, especially in the classroom. With this knowledge, it is important that teachers take a closer look at different behaviors and tendencies. For instance, a child with anxiety may present different behaviors depending on comfort level.

Here are a few signs to look for in children who may be suffering from anxiety:

Eye Contact

A child with anxiety may be resistant to making eye contact, especially during one-on-one conversations. It is important for educators to be mindful that the lack of eye contact is not a defiant or dismissive behavior. Instead, direct eye contact may be intimidating or anxiety-producing because the child feels uncomfortable with the direct attention. This can often be closely related to a more specific form of anxiety called social anxiety disorder. Children who suffer with social anxiety disorder exhibit symptoms of anxiety when they feel that all eyes are on them. Especially in social situations, such as in a classroom, a child may be reluctant to participate, work with others, or even answer one-on-one questions because of the discomfort.

Inattentiveness

Similarly, a child with anxiety may appear aloof, inattentive, or “checked out” during classroom instruction. Again, this may be an anxiety disorder rearing its head. A child with generalized anxiety disorder is often consumed with worries, fears, or concerns about an aspect of his or her life. When children fixate on a concern or worry, they are likely unable to concentrate in the classroom. This is very different from a student that is simply bored or disinterested. Furthermore, the constant fixation and worrying often continues at home, making it difficult for children to refocus or “power down.” The GAD symptoms will often result in insomnia or restlessness.

Irritability

Sometimes due to the insomnia, students with anxiety may exhibit irritability at school, as well. Of course, when sleep is regularly disrupted by anxiety, a child may appear to be more fatigued or ill-tempered. This type of behavior is different from a child who is simply choosing to disrupt or defy. When anxiety takes over, the irritability is simply an outlet for the frustration and stress.

With this in mind, it is important for teachers to identify behavioral concerns that are separate from the anxiety disorder. Often times, taking a little breather or moment to get a drink of water will be enough to allow the student to reset and alleviate the stress.